The Status of Facebook Jobs: It's Complicated

Status of Facebook Jobs: It’s Complicated

Old Facebook

What Facebook Looked Like in the Old Days

Facebook started out in 2004. I joined in late 2005. Only college and university students could sign up back then, and you could only register using your school-assigned email address. Now we might refer to it as a closed social network, with subnetworks of people who add each other as “friends”.

 

Naturally, most of the user-generated content on Facebook was posted with the assumption that only chosen friends would ever clap eyes on it. Messages on your Facebook wall (now your timeline) and selfies (taken without the advantage front-facing camera on your phone) were the norm, along with pictures of friends hanging out, partying, and making dumb faces.

 

If you’ve watched The Social Network, you will do doubt imagine that all sorts of social drama was acted out on the platform, and you’d probably be right. Facebook was responsible for popularizing “it’s complicated” as a relationship status, after all. Of course, it was also common to change your vital stats for fun – Antarctica as your hometown or relationship status set as “married” to unlikely match or platonic friend.

 

I’m not taking you down Millennial Memory Lane for no reason, mind you. The context of Facebook’s history and evolution is important to take into account the when evaluating the social media platform as a recruiting tool, because now it’s a new place to look for a job.

 

Back in November, TechCrunch reported on Facebook’s upcoming Jobs feature for company pages, and now it’s here. Let’s quickly review what we know about Facebook Jobs:

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eHarmony selling Elevated Careers

Industry News: eHarmony’s Elevated Careers for Sale

Elevated Careers is up for sale! Elevated Careers was intended to be a matching platform for candidates, jobs, and employers, and was created by online dating company eHarmony. eHarmony is known for its use of algorithms to match potential partners, and they presumably sought to apply similar methods to recruiting and job search.

 

Elevated Careers was launched in April of 2016, and featured extensive questionnaires and employer branding. Last week, Matt Charney reported that an email was sent to prospective buyers of Elevated Careers, with a slide deck explaining that the product was better in the hands of a company focused on business-to-business, rather than business-to-consumer (as eHarmony has traditionally been).

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New Years Resolutions for Recruiters: Sympathy for the Candidate

New Year’s Resolutions for Recruiters: Sympathy for the Job Seeker

If you’ve ever been unemployed, underemployed, or even an employed-but-active job seeker in the past decade, you know a certain kind of pain. Heck, even those passive job seekers who entertain the courtship of a recruiter know the feeling.

They say it’s a candidate’s market out there right now, especially for highly skilled and specialized workers, and yet, they suffer the same poor candidate experiences as those young and unskilled workers just joining the workforce. (Not that anybody deserves such treatment – you may also want to hire that young and unskilled person when they gain more skills and experience.)

When you’re on the other side of the fence as a recruiter or employer, it’s easy to get bogged down in your own processes and difficulties, and neglect to sympathize with job seekers who don’t have the benefit of your point of view.

To refresh your memory, the average job search goes something like this:

  1. After a lot of searching, you find a cool job post and think it’s a great opportunity that you’re qualified for and would enjoy. Maybe it’ll change your life!
  2. You carefully craft a cover letter, update or tweak your resume to suit, and hit “apply”.
  3. Then you click “apply”, and wind up in an Applicant Tracking System that makes some of your previous work feel repetitive. You fill out your contact info again and copy and paste the content of your resume and cover letter into a plain text format.
  4. You might have to re-enter your education or work history with names and dates, and at the end, answer a few screening questions about diversity, your qualifications, or your legal working status.
  5. Those last few questions tacked onto the end are probably designed to knock you out of the application process if you don’t answer the right way, giving you a sinking feeling as you hit the “submit” button.
  6. The whole rigamarole is sometimes followed by an email confirmation of receiving your application, but most often it’s silence.
  7. Lots of silence.
  8. Lather, rinse, repeat.
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simply hired shutdown alternatives timeline analysis

The Simply Hired Shutdown: News and Next Steps

You’ve likely already heard the news that job aggregator Simply Hired is shutting down on June 26th. A letter was sent to their customers and publishing partners, informing them of the shutdown.

The Simply Hired shutdown will impact those whose job sites are hosted by Simply Hired, and anyone using Simply Hired’s job widgets, API, and data feeds. Simply Hired staff also “face an uncertain future”, and many assume they will be laid off. It has since been reported through “a trusted source” that Recruit (Indeed’s parent company) has acquired Simply Hired.

 

Simply Hired Shutdown Timeline and News Round-Up

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Why Recruiters Should Add a Job Board

Why Recruiters Should Consider Adding a Job Board

We’ve talked about the sometimes blurred lines that distinguish between job boards, aggregators, and recruitment companies, as well as how their technology and business needs match up or overlap.

The traditional idea of a job board is morphing, changing, and growing to adapt to new employment trends and recruiting needs, so the idea of extending one’s job board services into the realm of recruiting isn’t a stretch.

But what about recruitment companies? Staffing agencies and contingency recruiting companies can benefit from consolidating how they advertise jobs and collect candidate information. Let’s take a look at the top three benefits of in-house job listing and candidate profiles.

Job Advertising Efficiency:

As a recruiter, you need to reach candidates where they are and bring them into the fold. With a job board that takes advantage of outbound feeds and sets up distribution relationships with other niche boards, aggregators, and recruiting networks, a recruiter can be done-in-one as far as their advertising needs go. 

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Hey Careerleaf, why don’t you offer a job board app?

Super-obvious, statement-of-fact, spoiler-alert for off-the-grid lifestylers: mobile devices are the most popular way users access the Internet, growing almost 400% over the last four years.

 

While riding the city bus, I noticed just how many of the passengers were using a device to send a message, play a game, watch a video, etc. Seeing someone using a smartphone is something I take for granted, but once I took a moment to focus on what my fellow passengers were doing, I experienced a split second of amazement – these mobile devices are everywhere!

 

Given the mobile revolution, we are often asked, “Why don’t you offer a job board app”?

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The Candidate of 2015: What We Know

It never hurts to get back to basics with candidates. What they want? How do they behave? And how do employers find and hire the best?

A number of companies have done large surveys of employers and job seekers to research and quantify the answers to those questions. Below I’ve collected some of the most important and interesting numbers from several notable surveys about hiring and job seeking in the year 2015.

 

The Mobile Candidate

  • 47% of job seekers search on mobile in bed, 38% while commuting, 30% on the job, and 18% in the bathroom1
  • 38% of candidates learn about opportunities on mobile devices, with a 90% increase from 2013 to 20142
  • 28% of candidates apply for positions through mobile devices, a 75% increase from 2013 to 20142
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5 Ways to Write Better Job Posts

We’ve broken down the basic components of a job post on this blog before, but there is always room for improvement. Here are five ways you can write better job posts, or help your customers do the same.

 

  1. Be Search-Friendly

This slideshare featured on Recruiting.com recommends avoiding overly creative job titles.  iMediaConnection has collected a list of hilariously (and unnecessarily) creative job titles here, that will give you an idea of what they mean. “Wizard of Light Bulb Moments” and “Chief Visionary Officer” might sound fun and quirky, but you’ll drastically reduce the discoverability of a job advertisement with that title. If you’re looking for an Inbound Marketing Strategist, don’t advertise for a “Growth Guru” if you’re hoping to cast a wide net. Candidates are unlikely to search using your fun and quirky terminology, and they won’t be using them in any email/job search alerts.

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Job Matching is Not a Magic Bullet

The most important thing about a job board is that it introduces candidates to employers, and vice versa. If that function is not working, then you do not have a job board.

The basics of how this process works usually goes something like this:

  1. Employer posts job opening
  2. Candidates discover the position
  3. Candidates apply for the position
  4. Employer reviews applications
  5. Employer contacts the candidates they’re interested in, followed by interviewing, hiring, etc.
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