The Status of Facebook Jobs: It's Complicated

Status of Facebook Jobs: It’s Complicated

Old Facebook

What Facebook Looked Like in the Old Days

Facebook started out in 2004. I joined in late 2005. Only college and university students could sign up back then, and you could only register using your school-assigned email address. Now we might refer to it as a closed social network, with subnetworks of people who add each other as “friends”.

 

Naturally, most of the user-generated content on Facebook was posted with the assumption that only chosen friends would ever clap eyes on it. Messages on your Facebook wall (now your timeline) and selfies (taken without the advantage front-facing camera on your phone) were the norm, along with pictures of friends hanging out, partying, and making dumb faces.

 

If you’ve watched The Social Network, you will do doubt imagine that all sorts of social drama was acted out on the platform, and you’d probably be right. Facebook was responsible for popularizing “it’s complicated” as a relationship status, after all. Of course, it was also common to change your vital stats for fun – Antarctica as your hometown or relationship status set as “married” to unlikely match or platonic friend.

 

I’m not taking you down Millennial Memory Lane for no reason, mind you. The context of Facebook’s history and evolution is important to take into account the when evaluating the social media platform as a recruiting tool, because now it’s a new place to look for a job.

 

Back in November, TechCrunch reported on Facebook’s upcoming Jobs feature for company pages, and now it’s here. Let’s quickly review what we know about Facebook Jobs:

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eHarmony selling Elevated Careers

Industry News: eHarmony’s Elevated Careers for Sale

Elevated Careers is up for sale! Elevated Careers was intended to be a matching platform for candidates, jobs, and employers, and was created by online dating company eHarmony. eHarmony is known for its use of algorithms to match potential partners, and they presumably sought to apply similar methods to recruiting and job search.

 

Elevated Careers was launched in April of 2016, and featured extensive questionnaires and employer branding. Last week, Matt Charney reported that an email was sent to prospective buyers of Elevated Careers, with a slide deck explaining that the product was better in the hands of a company focused on business-to-business, rather than business-to-consumer (as eHarmony has traditionally been).

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Recruiting & Job Board News Round-Up

Recruiting & Job Board News Round-Up

January is almost over and it seemed like a good time to have a look around at what people in the recruiting and job board industry are talking about right now.

 

Recruiting Conferences

The Job Board Doctor has a nice round-up of events and conferences relating to recruiting, job boards, and HR technology. If you plan to attend one of these events, it’s an opportunity to network, learn from peers and experts, get excited and inspired about your own projects.

The events listed include events by ERE, TAtech, SHRM, JobG8 and more. See the full list here.

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Your Job Board Branding Checklist

Your Job Board Branding Checklist

Whether you’re starting a new job board or you’re giving yours a fresh coat of paint, it’s important to think about your branding.

For some people “branding” just means a logo and a name, but it can encompass a lot more than that. Visual graphics and their placement, as well as messaging and content all contribute to the brand of your job board or recruiting platform.

The following list may cover more (or less) than what you really need, but it should help guide your process. If you already have everything you need, let this list help you to organize it all into a cohesive branding package that makes it easy to use your branding as you create new content and promotions.

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Hybrid Recruiting Job Boards

Hybrid Recruiting Job Boards

A recruiter is angry at job boards.

 

Why?hybrid-recruiting-fishing-1

 

Because he pays for the service of advertising jobs on a platform that will get him the candidates he wants, but the candidates he gets are subjected to job advertisements and offers from every other recruiter who uses that job board.

 

They’re all fishing from the same pond. 

 

Most recruitment companies have an ATS (applicant tracking system/software), and use multiple tools to advertise jobs and engage talent. One side effect of using multiple tools and platforms for recruiting is that you sometimes wind up fishing from the same pond as everyone else. Australian recruiter Simon Cox writes:

The online advertising employers and agencies pay for and spend hours preparing is being used to build databases of candidates for the benefit of job boards. Applying for a job on SEEK, CareerOne, Indeed.com and many other job boards, means being encouraged/cajoled/funnelled towards setting up a personal profile on that platform.  Everything is about trying to get you to say ‘yes’ to employers being able to search your CV.  Indeed.com and CareerOne are actually contacting those candidates directly to offer them recruitment services.

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How Recruiters Use Job Boards

How Recruiters Use Job Boards

Job boards come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and some don’t even call themselves “job boards”. There are small, independent job board businesses, there are large-scale platforms that generate revenue through selling job posts in addition to other services (think GlassDoor, Indeed, and LinkedIn), and there are the career pages of corporate websites and the job postings that tie into Applicant Tracking Systems on recruitment company websites.

Recruiters, regardless of their in-house tech, use job boards as a part of their overall recruitment marketing. Recruitment marketing, by the way, encompasses all that recruiters do to reach attract, nurture, and engage candidates. Recruitment marketing can include posting jobs, social media, email, phone, content marketing, and more.

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New Years Resolutions for Recruiters: Sympathy for the Candidate

New Year’s Resolutions for Recruiters: Sympathy for the Job Seeker

If you’ve ever been unemployed, underemployed, or even an employed-but-active job seeker in the past decade, you know a certain kind of pain. Heck, even those passive job seekers who entertain the courtship of a recruiter know the feeling.

They say it’s a candidate’s market out there right now, especially for highly skilled and specialized workers, and yet, they suffer the same poor candidate experiences as those young and unskilled workers just joining the workforce. (Not that anybody deserves such treatment – you may also want to hire that young and unskilled person when they gain more skills and experience.)

When you’re on the other side of the fence as a recruiter or employer, it’s easy to get bogged down in your own processes and difficulties, and neglect to sympathize with job seekers who don’t have the benefit of your point of view.

To refresh your memory, the average job search goes something like this:

  1. After a lot of searching, you find a cool job post and think it’s a great opportunity that you’re qualified for and would enjoy. Maybe it’ll change your life!
  2. You carefully craft a cover letter, update or tweak your resume to suit, and hit “apply”.
  3. Then you click “apply”, and wind up in an Applicant Tracking System that makes some of your previous work feel repetitive. You fill out your contact info again and copy and paste the content of your resume and cover letter into a plain text format.
  4. You might have to re-enter your education or work history with names and dates, and at the end, answer a few screening questions about diversity, your qualifications, or your legal working status.
  5. Those last few questions tacked onto the end are probably designed to knock you out of the application process if you don’t answer the right way, giving you a sinking feeling as you hit the “submit” button.
  6. The whole rigamarole is sometimes followed by an email confirmation of receiving your application, but most often it’s silence.
  7. Lots of silence.
  8. Lather, rinse, repeat.
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Job Boards and Recruiting in 2017

Job Boards and Recruiting in 2017

Yep, it’s that time of the year again! With December brings the prospect of a brand new year and predictions about the ever-evolving recruiting industry.

So what does the future hold in store for us in 2017?

 

Mobile, mobile, mobile!

Yeah, yeah, it’s been on similar lists for the past several years, but here it is again. It was only four years ago that 90% of Fortune 500 companies did not have mobile-friendly careers pages. That number has improved since there, but there is still a good number of large companies whose online recruiting tactics haven’t kept up with technology. And if they’re having trouble keeping up, small and medium size businesses are facing the same challenge, especially if their web presence predates the iPhone.

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Recruiting News and Insights

September Recruiting News & Insights Round-Up

There are lots of things happening in the recruiting industry right now, so check out a few gems of relevance to job boards.

 

CareerBuilder for Sale

The big news last week was that CareerBuilder, another older but big-name jobs aggregator would soon have a “For Sale” sign pitched on its front lawn.

In contrast to Monster and SimplyHired (who have been acquired by Randstad and Indeed’s parent company, respectively), CareerBuilder has been re-shaping itself into an end-to-end HR solution.

Jeff Dickey-Chasins of JobBoardDoctor.com points out that this likely isn’t a reflection on job boards as a whole:

What does this mean for the rest of the job board and online recruiting industry? Not a lot. Like the LinkedIn and Monster purchases, it is less reflective of industry trends and more reflective of big company priorities.

I tend to agree. Job boards come in all shapes and sizes, and they are a part of and impacted by the recruiting industry at large. However, niche and regional job boards are a different animal than those of companies like Monster, SimplyHired, and CareerBuilder. Smaller, focused job boards with good sales and marketing habits, a defined market and a clear value proposition are still finding success.

New HR Tech Hurts Hiring?

Over on PBS Newshour’s blog, Nick Corcodilos tackles the question of whether some technologies help or hinder the recruiting process in his Ask the HeadHunter column.

The question stems from reports that while job openings are abundant, not every job posting results in someone getting hired. As a way to explain this phenomenon, some point to the gap between the skills employers need and the skills that job candidates actually possess, and others speculate employer behaviour around hiring may also be a factor.

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randstad buys monster - what does it mean for job boards?

Randstad Buys Monster – But What Does That Mean for Job Boards?

Last week news broke that global recruitment company Randstad bought job board giant Monster, and the recruiting blogosphere is abuzz with discussion.

Founded in 1999, Monster.com was one of the earliest online job boards and remains notable for having stayed in the game this long. Randstad is a multinational recruiting and staffing company with 29,000 employees of their own.

Monster’s stock value has fluctuated in the past and has been in decline in recent years. The sale to Randstad has come in at a price far below their estimated value in previous years, which leads to three big questions about the deal.

  • What went wrong with Monster?
  • What does Randstad get out of the deal?
  • What does it mean for job boards that one of the earliest and oldest disappears?
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