Convincing Great Talent to Join Your Job Board

Convincing Great Talent to Join Your Job Board

In the recruiting industry, there is frequent debate about passive vs active candidates. A passive candidate is someone who has a job, and isn’t really focused on finding a new one. They may occasionally look for jobs or apply, but they’re not as absorbed in the activity as someone who is an active job seeker. An active job seeker might be unemployed or trying to leave a job they don’t like. They’re applying to jobs regularly, and are always on the lookout for opportunities.

 

There is the perception that passive candidates are better, perhaps because their current employment implies success in their role. On other hand, a passive candidate who can be lured away from a job they’re content with could be just as easily lured away from the employer you recruit them to join. An active job seeker may want the job more, and work harder to keep it.

 

However you feel about recruiting passive or active candidates, a job board needs both.

 

By now, you should be familiar with the chicken-and-the-egg game of simultaneously attracting both talent and customers to your job board. Last week I talked about finding the right balance of original content to make your job board unique and valuable enough to be useful to job seekers and develop good SEO, a crucial element of attracting job seekers to your board.

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Is your job board competing with Indeed?

Are You Competing with Indeed?

I’ve said before that I think you can compete with Indeed. Yes, you.

 

I don’t say it because I have blind faith in you (although I’m sure you’re great), I say it because I know that a job board or recruiting platform with a value proposition that resonates with and delivers for its target market can, indeed, compete with Indeed.

 

A focused target market and unique content can define what makes a job board valuable and preferable for job seekers and employers/recruiters to use over using a site like Indeed. Unique content (candidate profiles, blog content, job posts, landing pages, etc.) can arguably come in two forms – original content that is found nowhere else, or content that is curated in such a way that your organization and delivery of it is unique and valuable. In many cases, unique content is a combination of both original content found and unique curation of content that was first published elsewhere.

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SEO Marketing Cheat Sheet for Job Boards

SEO Marketing Cheat Sheet for Job Boards [Infographic]

Search Engine Optimization is never going to truly be a “set it and forget it” tool for getting traffic to your job board or turning up on the first page of Google search results.

 

Ideally, search engines like Google and Bing want web search to be a meritocracy. Websites and pages that are relevant to the words or phrases you search for and have proven themselves to be valid and valuable should be what rises to the top.

 

Websites new and old have challenges in managing their SEO, often for different reasons. Old websites usually struggle with updating or cleaning up the structural and technical components of their site’s content, design, and its organization. New websites usually struggle to figure out how they can be unique and valuable enough to differentiate themselves from existing sites, and build up credibility.

 

There is a view, which stems from the early days of SEO, that making a website turn up on the first page of search results can be achieved simply through technical tricks and hacks. Google, in particular, is known for its evolving search algorithm – the way Google applies your search terms to look for appropriate search results today is not the way it worked last year, five years ago, or ten years ago.

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The Status of Facebook Jobs: It's Complicated

Status of Facebook Jobs: It’s Complicated

Old Facebook

What Facebook Looked Like in the Old Days

Facebook started out in 2004. I joined in late 2005. Only college and university students could sign up back then, and you could only register using your school-assigned email address. Now we might refer to it as a closed social network, with subnetworks of people who add each other as “friends”. Later on, high school students were allowed to sign up, and then eventually the world at large was welcome on Facebook.

 

Naturally, most of the user-generated content on Facebook during those early years was posted with the assumption that only chosen friends would ever clap eyes on it. Messages on your Facebook wall (now your timeline) and selfies (taken without the advantage front-facing camera on your phone) were the norm, along with pictures of friends hanging out, partying, and making dumb faces.

 

If you’ve watched The Social Network, you can no doubt imagine that all sorts of social drama was acted out on the platform, and you’d probably be right. Facebook was responsible for popularizing “it’s complicated” as a relationship status, after all. On the other hand, it was also common to change your vital stats for fun – Antarctica as your hometown or relationship status set as “married” to unlikely match, platonic friend, or favourite food.

 

I’m not taking you down Millennial Memory Lane for no reason, mind you. The context of Facebook’s history and evolution is important to take into account when evaluating the social media platform as a recruiting tool, since now it’s a place to look for a job.

 

Back in November, TechCrunch reported on Facebook’s upcoming Jobs feature for company pages, and now it’s here. Let’s quickly review what we know about Facebook Jobs:

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eHarmony selling Elevated Careers

Industry News: eHarmony’s Elevated Careers for Sale

Elevated Careers is up for sale! Elevated Careers was intended to be a matching platform for candidates, jobs, and employers, and was created by online dating company eHarmony. eHarmony is known for its use of algorithms to match potential partners, and they presumably sought to apply similar methods to recruiting and job search.

 

Elevated Careers was launched in April of 2016, and featured extensive questionnaires and employer branding. Last week, Matt Charney reported that an email was sent to prospective buyers of Elevated Careers, with a slide deck explaining that the product was better in the hands of a company focused on business-to-business, rather than business-to-consumer (as eHarmony has traditionally been).

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6 More Reasons Not to Start a Job Board

6 More Reasons Not to Start a Job Board

Maybe it’s the magic of reverse-psychology, but our most popular blog post has consistently been 5 Reasons Not to Start a Job Board since it was published.

 

It’s not that I don’t think people should start job boards. In fact, it’s kind of important to our business that people do run and start job boards. But, there are things that can cause problems for a new job board, and I’m interested in helping you avoid and overcome those problems.

 

So, back by popular demand, here are 6 more reasons not to start a job board!

 

1. You Don’t Know What You’re Selling

Why should anyone use your job board? Why should job seekers use your board, rather than using Indeed, LinkedIn, other large aggregators and job boards? Why should employers use your job board either, for that matter?

 

If you can’t answer those questions, you have a problem. This is usually the first thing to trip up a new job board. If you can’t think of what your board offers that other competitors (big or small) don’t, you’re going to have a hard time selling it to employers and candidates.

 

One of the reasons why job boards with a focus on a particular niche or regional market are successful is because it makes it easier to identify the problems of finding great talent and great jobs, and then work to solve them.

 

Make sure you know what you’re selling so you can communicate it to the people to whom you’re selling.

 

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The Politics of Hiring

Some people don’t like talking about politics. (I do, but I also like pineapple on pizza, but I’m told that is also controversial.)

Right now it’s hard to avoid news headlines proclaiming all sorts of things about jobs, trade, and the economy. The new U.S. president has been the cause of much of it, and the recruiting and technology industries are particularly impacted by his recent executive order and how it affects immigrants, refugees, and foreign workers.

Last Monday I was heartened to see Betakit – a website dedicated to startups and technology in Canada – had published a page titled, An Open Letter From the Canadian Tech Community: Diversity is Our Strength.

The letter is signed by Canadians working in tech and illustrates some of the reasons why the president’s policy affects that industry:

Many Canadian tech entrepreneurs are immigrants, are the children of immigrants, employ and have been employed by immigrants.

As connected economies, decisions by the United States can directly impact every business north of the border. The recently signed Executive Order to block entry of citizens from seven countries has already impacted several in our community. As a community, we are all affected.

 

In a similar vein, Vanity Fair’s Maya Kosoff talks about how some Silicon Valley leaders are reacting:

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Recruiting & Job Board News Round-Up

Recruiting & Job Board News Round-Up

January is almost over and it seemed like a good time to have a look around at what people in the recruiting and job board industry are talking about right now.

 

Recruiting Conferences

The Job Board Doctor has a nice round-up of events and conferences relating to recruiting, job boards, and HR technology. If you plan to attend one of these events, it’s an opportunity to network, learn from peers and experts, get excited and inspired about your own projects.

The events listed include events by ERE, TAtech, SHRM, JobG8 and more. See the full list here.

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Your Job Board Branding Checklist

Your Job Board Branding Checklist

Whether you’re starting a new job board or you’re giving yours a fresh coat of paint, it’s important to think about your branding.

For some people “branding” just means a logo and a name, but it can encompass a lot more than that. Visual graphics and their placement, as well as messaging and content all contribute to the brand of your job board or recruiting platform.

The following list may cover more (or less) than what you really need, but it should help guide your process. If you already have everything you need, let this list help you to organize it all into a cohesive branding package that makes it easy to use your branding as you create new content and promotions.

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Hybrid Recruiting Job Boards

Hybrid Recruiting Job Boards

A recruiter is angry at job boards.

 

Why?hybrid-recruiting-fishing-1

 

Because he pays for the service of advertising jobs on a platform that will get him the candidates he wants, but the candidates he gets are subjected to job advertisements and offers from every other recruiter who uses that job board.

 

They’re all fishing from the same pond. 

 

Most recruitment companies have an ATS (applicant tracking system/software), and use multiple tools to advertise jobs and engage talent. One side effect of using multiple tools and platforms for recruiting is that you sometimes wind up fishing from the same pond as everyone else. Australian recruiter Simon Cox writes:

The online advertising employers and agencies pay for and spend hours preparing is being used to build databases of candidates for the benefit of job boards. Applying for a job on SEEK, CareerOne, Indeed.com and many other job boards, means being encouraged/cajoled/funnelled towards setting up a personal profile on that platform.  Everything is about trying to get you to say ‘yes’ to employers being able to search your CV.  Indeed.com and CareerOne are actually contacting those candidates directly to offer them recruitment services.

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