Convincing Great Talent to Join Your Job Board

Convincing Great Talent to Join Your Job Board

In the recruiting industry, there is frequent debate about passive vs active candidates. A passive candidate is someone who has a job, and isn’t really focused on finding a new one. They may occasionally look for jobs or apply, but they’re not as absorbed in the activity as someone who is an active job seeker. An active job seeker might be unemployed or trying to leave a job they don’t like. They’re applying to jobs regularly, and are always on the lookout for opportunities.

 

There is the perception that passive candidates are better, perhaps because their current employment implies success in their role. On other hand, a passive candidate who can be lured away from a job they’re content with could be just as easily lured away from the employer you recruit them to join. An active job seeker may want the job more, and work harder to keep it.

 

However you feel about recruiting passive or active candidates, a job board needs both.

 

By now, you should be familiar with the chicken-and-the-egg game of simultaneously attracting both talent and customers to your job board. Last week I talked about finding the right balance of original content to make your job board unique and valuable enough to be useful to job seekers and develop good SEO, a crucial element of attracting job seekers to your board.

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Is your job board competing with Indeed?

Are You Competing with Indeed?

I’ve said before that I think you can compete with Indeed. Yes, you.

 

I don’t say it because I have blind faith in you (although I’m sure you’re great), I say it because I know that a job board or recruiting platform with a value proposition that resonates with and delivers for its target market can, indeed, compete with Indeed.

 

A focused target market and unique content can define what makes a job board valuable and preferable for job seekers and employers/recruiters to use over using a site like Indeed. Unique content (candidate profiles, blog content, job posts, landing pages, etc.) can arguably come in two forms – original content that is found nowhere else, or content that is curated in such a way that your organization and delivery of it is unique and valuable. In many cases, unique content is a combination of both original content found and unique curation of content that was first published elsewhere.

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SEO Marketing Cheat Sheet for Job Boards

SEO Marketing Cheat Sheet for Job Boards [Infographic]

Search Engine Optimization is never going to truly be a “set it and forget it” tool for getting traffic to your job board or turning up on the first page of Google search results.

 

Ideally, search engines like Google and Bing want web search to be a meritocracy. Websites and pages that are relevant to the words or phrases you search for and have proven themselves to be valid and valuable should be what rises to the top.

 

Websites new and old have challenges in managing their SEO, often for different reasons. Old websites usually struggle with updating or cleaning up the structural and technical components of their site’s content, design, and its organization. New websites usually struggle to figure out how they can be unique and valuable enough to differentiate themselves from existing sites, and build up credibility.

 

There is a view, which stems from the early days of SEO, that making a website turn up on the first page of search results can be achieved simply through technical tricks and hacks. Google, in particular, is known for its evolving search algorithm – the way Google applies your search terms to look for appropriate search results today is not the way it worked last year, five years ago, or ten years ago.

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6 More Reasons Not to Start a Job Board

6 More Reasons Not to Start a Job Board

Maybe it’s the magic of reverse-psychology, but our most popular blog post has consistently been 5 Reasons Not to Start a Job Board since it was published.

 

It’s not that I don’t think people should start job boards. In fact, it’s kind of important to our business that people do run and start job boards. But, there are things that can cause problems for a new job board, and I’m interested in helping you avoid and overcome those problems.

 

So, back by popular demand, here are 6 more reasons not to start a job board!

 

1. You Don’t Know What You’re Selling

Why should anyone use your job board? Why should job seekers use your board, rather than using Indeed, LinkedIn, other large aggregators and job boards? Why should employers use your job board either, for that matter?

 

If you can’t answer those questions, you have a problem. This is usually the first thing to trip up a new job board. If you can’t think of what your board offers that other competitors (big or small) don’t, you’re going to have a hard time selling it to employers and candidates.

 

One of the reasons why job boards with a focus on a particular niche or regional market are successful is because it makes it easier to identify the problems of finding great talent and great jobs, and then work to solve them.

 

Make sure you know what you’re selling so you can communicate it to the people to whom you’re selling.

 

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Your Job Board Branding Checklist

Your Job Board Branding Checklist

Whether you’re starting a new job board or you’re giving yours a fresh coat of paint, it’s important to think about your branding.

For some people “branding” just means a logo and a name, but it can encompass a lot more than that. Visual graphics and their placement, as well as messaging and content all contribute to the brand of your job board or recruiting platform.

The following list may cover more (or less) than what you really need, but it should help guide your process. If you already have everything you need, let this list help you to organize it all into a cohesive branding package that makes it easy to use your branding as you create new content and promotions.

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Hybrid Recruiting Job Boards

Hybrid Recruiting Job Boards

A recruiter is angry at job boards.

 

Why?hybrid-recruiting-fishing-1

 

Because he pays for the service of advertising jobs on a platform that will get him the candidates he wants, but the candidates he gets are subjected to job advertisements and offers from every other recruiter who uses that job board.

 

They’re all fishing from the same pond. 

 

Most recruitment companies have an ATS (applicant tracking system/software), and use multiple tools to advertise jobs and engage talent. One side effect of using multiple tools and platforms for recruiting is that you sometimes wind up fishing from the same pond as everyone else. Australian recruiter Simon Cox writes:

The online advertising employers and agencies pay for and spend hours preparing is being used to build databases of candidates for the benefit of job boards. Applying for a job on SEEK, CareerOne, Indeed.com and many other job boards, means being encouraged/cajoled/funnelled towards setting up a personal profile on that platform.  Everything is about trying to get you to say ‘yes’ to employers being able to search your CV.  Indeed.com and CareerOne are actually contacting those candidates directly to offer them recruitment services.

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How Recruiters Use Job Boards

How Recruiters Use Job Boards

Job boards come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and some don’t even call themselves “job boards”. There are small, independent job board businesses, there are large-scale platforms that generate revenue through selling job posts in addition to other services (think GlassDoor, Indeed, and LinkedIn), and there are the career pages of corporate websites and the job postings that tie into Applicant Tracking Systems on recruitment company websites.

Recruiters, regardless of their in-house tech, use job boards as a part of their overall recruitment marketing. Recruitment marketing, by the way, encompasses all that recruiters do to reach attract, nurture, and engage candidates. Recruitment marketing can include posting jobs, social media, email, phone, content marketing, and more.

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Your Pre-Launch Job Board Plan

Your Pre-Launch Job Board Plan

You want to start a job board, but you’ve asked yourself some tough questions and realize you may need to do some legwork before you’re ready to go all in. Don’t lose heart – Careerleaf’s pre-launch plan for job boards should help you reach your goal.

If you decided you’re not ready to launch yet – look at the reasons why and turn them into milestones along the path to starting a profitable job board business. The criteria you’re using to judge whether or not you are ready likely involves four key areas: market research, candidates, employers, and branding.

 

Build a Candidate Following

To get employers to be your customers, you need to prove you can deliver the kind of candidates they want to hire. To do that, you need to establish a connection with the candidates you and your would-be customers want to attract. There are a lot of great, cheap ways you can start community-building before you launch your job board, including:

  • Social media: share content, resources, and advice with the candidates you want to target. Take advantage of the hashtags, groups, lists, and search functions that social media platforms provide to discover and engage with the online community in your target industry. Interact with people and start providing value now.
  • Blogging: plant your flag and start creating your own valuable content and resources. You can also contribute content to other industry blogs to expose your brand to wider audiences in your market.
  • Start a Group or Mailing List: you might already be in the habit of finding and sharing amazing jobs within your space – why not start a social media group or mailing list to share them with subscribers? This is especially valuable, because people who have opted in to this service are more likely to want to use the amazing job board you’re going to launch.
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Questions for Job Board Entrepreneurs

Questions Job Board Entrepreneurs Should Ask

This week’s blog post comes from Jonathan Page, Careerleaf’s Director of Sales and Marketing.

Every week I have conversations with entrepreneurs researching technology solutions for a new job board or career portal, and often provide advice on their value propositions, target markets and initial launch plans. Some of this advice is specific to a particular business idea, but much of the advice crosses industry or territorial differences.

The best advice I can give job board entrepreneurs begins with asking a series of 5 core questions:

 

  1. Where and how are you getting your job seekers? Why are they interested in you?

There is a reason that aggregators and virtually every job board in existence pays or has paid for candidate traffic. Your candidate traffic is why employers will pay you. So if you don’t have an impressive* number of contact emails for your niche, you aren’t ready to set up your job board or invest in a technology solution.

Priority number one is having something of value to say to your target candidates and start winning them to your tribe.
*The term impressive is purposefully relative – the more differentiated and desirable the candidates the smaller the number needs to be to qualify as impressive. Also, understand that geography is implicit in any Niche and should not be ignored.

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Outbound Phone Campaigns for Job Boards

Just Pick Up the Phone: Outbound Phone Campaigns for Job Boards

There are so many cases where a problem can be solved with a simple phone call.  Wondering why an employer posted one job on your board last year? Find yourself wishing you could help that new company from the news with their hiring?

Just pick up the phone.

That’s a phrase I have often heard from Careerleaf’s own CEO, whose recruiting and entrepreneurial background has given her many opportunities to test out her own advice. A quick conversation over the phone can be an incredibly effective way to qualify your employer or recruiter customers, build relationships with them, and solve problems.

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